How Many Dimensions Are There In Emotional Intelligence

People with high emotional intelligence are able to recognize, understand, manage, and utilize their own emotions as well as those of others. They are also aware of how they affect others and what effects they have on them.

This article will talk about three different types of emotional intelligence. We’ll discuss each one separately before coming back together for our conclusion. So, let's get started!

Emotional quotient (EQ)

Your EQ is your ability to identify and describe your feelings and other people’s feelings. You use this knowledge to relate to and form relationships with other people.

Some say that being emotionally intelligent is the same thing as having empathy. While that is true, it is important to note that empathizers are only able to feel things for a limited time before needing some rest or relaxation.

In fact, there is no such word as “empathic” because the dictionary defines it as describing something as painful for someone else. That can't be right!

So instead, we refer to individuals who have high emotional intelligence as "intelligent" since they know how to apply emotion to situations and determine the best course of action.

Intuitors are not necessarily empathetic, but they do possess an understanding of human behavior that helps them predict future actions. In other words, they make good guesses at why people act like they do.

The second dimension of emotional intelligence

how many dimensions are there in emotional intelligence

The other major component of emotional quotient or EQ is what we refer to as ‘other-focused’ empathy. This looks beyond your own self-interests to consider how someone else feels, and why they feel that way.

Other-focus empathizers can identify and understand emotions in others which helps them read people more effectively. They are also able to apply this knowledge to learn about the person and their potential interactions with others.

The third dimension of emotional intelligence

how many dimensions are there in emotional intelligence

A more recent development in understanding how emotionally intelligent people differ from others is the concept of emotional literacy or what some call ‘emotional quotient’ (EQ). This was first discussed in academic literature in 2007, when Daniel Goleman published his book titled "Emotional Intelligence."

Since then, it has become one of the most popular concepts for defining emotional intelligence.

Golem defined EQ as someone's capacity to recognize their own emotions and those of other people, use these insights to motivate yourself and others, and apply this knowledge to improve your relationships with others.

He also mentioned that while everyone has an overall level of empathy, there are different types of empathetic strengths such as solid emotion recognition, using emotions to motivate behavior, and acting with integrity by keeping promises.

Some people have very high levels of self-control which help them avoid impulsive actions, whereas others may be highly motivated – they can easily get into action without too much effort.

The fourth dimension of emotional intelligence

how many dimensions are there in emotional intelligence

Another important factor that contributes to our overall EQ is what we refer to as self-awareness or internal awareness. This element comes from understanding yourself and your emotions, which are the most powerful forces in your life.

Becoming more aware of your thoughts, feelings and behaviors helps you understand why you behave the way you do and gives you an opportunity to change how you respond to situations.

It also enables you to recognize when things go wrong and can help you prevent future problems by recognizing warning signs.

The fifth dimension of emotional intelligence

how many dimensions are there in emotional intelligence

A growing body of research suggests that there are more than two main types of EI. Some studies suggest that people who score high in cognitive empathy have an edge over those with little or no empathic ability. But we need to be careful about how we define these terms.

Cognitive empathy is the understanding of what emotions other people experience. This could mean being able to identify what someone looks like when they’re experiencing happiness, sadness, fear, or any other emotion. It also includes putting yourself in their shoes and figuring out if it would feel okay to do something given their current state of mind.

Some researchers believe that having higher levels of cognitive empathy helps you understand why people behave the way they do sometimes (for example, by predicting why someone may become angry after a bad argument). This can help you avoid repeated arguments by identifying the source of their anger, but only if you recognize that they may be hurt first.

The sixth dimension of emotional intelligence

how many dimensions are there in emotional intelligence

A more recent development in understanding emotional skills comes from Peter Vella, an organizational psychologist who co-developed his Theory of Reflected Valuing. This theory focuses on what he calls “reflection” — thinking about your emotions and how they affect you and others.

In his book Flourish, Daniel Goleman describes this as having a "second person" perspective. He says that when we are aware of our feelings for someone else, we can sometimes learn something about them by looking at ourselves.

This kind of insight is possible because humans have a sense of self or ego. We know when we feel good about ourselves and we recognize it when people praise us. It makes us happy and gives us a feeling of strength.

By the same token, we also know when we don't like themselves and why not. When they fail to acknowledge their achievements, lose face, or show lack of confidence, it sets off warning signals.

With respect to loved ones, there's a difference between those who devote attention to them only during times of success and happiness and those who check in with them even when things aren't going well.

The first type of person gets a false sense of accomplishment that vanishes quickly, while the second knows that things will probably stay bad for a while but they'll be around for the long term.

The seventh dimension of emotional intelligence

how many dimensions are there in emotional intelligence

A growing body of research suggests that there are seven major dimensions to assess when looking at emotional intelligence. These include: motivation, empathy, self-control, stress management, responsibility, leadership, and communication.

While some people may feel these traits are hard to develop, they can be learned through training and practice. By enhancing your emotional intelligence, you can improve your success in life and work, and help others do the same.

It's important to note that while everyone has certain levels of each of these qualities, not all people use them effectively. In fact, one study found that only about 20 percent of participants were able to identify themselves as having good social skills.

Another limitation is that although most studies agree upon a total of seven factors, some researchers suggest eight or even nine. Whichever number you choose really doesn't matter too much.

The eighth dimension of emotional intelligence

how many dimensions are there in emotional intelligence

People with high EQ are not only aware of how they feel, but also learn to manage their emotions. They know what buttons to push and which ones to hold onto or take off for more productive changes.

People with high EQ understand that it is important to reduce your level of stress before you can relax.

They recognize that sleep is essential for overall health so they make sure to get some even if they're not feeling particularly well.

And they believe in taking good care of yourself by eating nutritious food and exercising regularly. All these things contribute to long term wellness.1

In fact, there's a theory called "mentalization" that says it is our thoughts about life and ourselves that help us stay healthy.2 Mentalizing means understanding why you do certain things and learning from them.

You might think that something isn't working and try to figure out why, but you haven't really worked outside of the situation yet. A higher-EQ person would instead consider possible alternatives like trying another strategy or approach.

The ninth dimension of emotional intelligence

how many dimensions are there in emotional intelligence

While most definitions of emotional quotient (EQ) emphasize having more emotions or less emotion, there is another way to conceptualize it. Some define EQ as knowing what kind of emotions are needed at any given time and being able to use them effectively.

This view was popularized by Daniel Goleman in his best-selling book “Emotional Intelligence”. In this theory, you don't necessarily have to feel all the different feelings that everyone else does, but you need to know which ones are necessary for effective functioning and how to use them.

In other words, you don't have to be like me — I'm sure you've noticed people who seem totally devoid of emotions.

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